Loading…
This event has ended. Create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic
Thursday, March 6 • 4:30pm - 6:30pm
Poster: Modeling and computational challenges for transient finite element computations at dynamic gas-liquid-solid contact lines, Alex Lee, Rice University

Sign up or log in to save this to your schedule and see who's attending!

Fluid flows with complex rheology and dynamic interfaces are important in many industrial applications, such as optimizing liquid printing and coating processes for manufacturing nanomaterials, or determining the flow of oil/brine systems in porous rockbed for oil recovery. Such transient flows featuring the evolution of solid-liquid-gas interfaces remain difficult to compute, especially when the liquid has a complex rheology. The difficulties are due to both high computing demands and the complexity of modeling various aspects of the system. For example, OpenMP-parallelized calculations for liquid transfer efficiency of a gravure printing process took roughly 8 cpu core-years on the Rice HPC clusters to obtain data published in [1]; this was in the simplified case of a static contact line model and non-dynamic gas phase. The physics of three-phase interfaces are still poorly understood so that there are currently several strategies tailored to specific purposes. We adopt an implementation of Navier's slip law that fits naturally into our transient Petrov-Galerkin Finite Element Method, and allows more realistic physics to be applied at the contact line [2]. Still, there are several computational challenges to be addressed, including mesh resolution local to the contact line, dynamic contact angle modeling, incorporation of the conformation tensor based model for viscoelastic liquids, and stability of time integration for such tightly coupled systems. In the contexts of our gravure printing problem and some toy problems---including one of potential interest in oil recovery---we will discuss our current advances and demonstrate our successes in addressing these challenges. [1] Lee, J. A., Rothstein, J. P., & Pasquali, M. (2013). J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech., 199, 1–11. [2] Sprittles, J. E., & Shikhmurzaev, Y. D. (2011). Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 68(10), 1257–1298.

Speakers

Thursday March 6, 2014 4:30pm - 6:30pm
BRC Exhibit Hall Rice University 6500 Main Street at University, Houston, TX 77030